Skip to Content

Monster Math–Problem Solving and Measurement

Sharing is caring!

Ten more activities to add to your math box. This series is a continuation of PROBLEM SOLVING and an introduction to MEASUREMENT.

Materials:
Yarn
Number Cards (attached)
Paper Clips
Straws

1.) Find numbers in a newspaper. Cut them out and glue them to a blank calendar or a paper marked off like a calendar. (Numbers may vary in size and style, and two-digit numbers can be made from two different numbers)

2.) Count the number of chairs in your house. Now count the number of table and chair legs.

3.) Practice your number words on the NUMBER CARDS.

4.) Using your TANGRAM pieces, try to make as many animals as possible.

The development of measurement concepts in children requires a great deal of experience. Children need to make direct comparisons to explore different lengths, weights, capacities, duration of time. We use nonstandard measurements such as a pencil before we use rulers, etc.

1.) Gather your family together and see who has the longest hair length. Who has the shortest? (Don’t forget to include pets!)

2.) Length Treasure Hunt: Have your mom cut 10 different lengths of string or yarn. (2″-20″) Look around your house and find items that are of the length of each string. Draw a picture of each item in order of smallest to longest.

3.) Draw Straws: Cut STRAWS or sticks into different lengths. Put them into a paper bag. Have some cards that say shortest, longest. Please put them in the bag, too. Your mom draws a straw, and you draw a straw…then draw a card—the one with the shortest or longest wins according to what the cards say. The winner gets the point and puts the straw and card back. Do it several times, and the child compares straws each time.

4.) Using five paper clips hooked together, go around your house and record items that are five paper clips long.

5.) Get 3 or 4 small different sized containers. The problem is to put them in order of which holds the least and which holds the greatest. Use water to help make a strategy.

6.) Measure each member of your family using a ruler or a yardstick. Then draw a picture of your family in order, from smallest to tallest.

Number Cards

 
Mommy's Memorandum
error: Content is protected !!